Wednesday, December 18, 2013

Sober Snow Buddies

Community  +  Hospitality  +  Respect  +  Stewardship  +  Love of Learning

Dear CSS Students,  

As we enter into the winter season in Duluth, the staff of Residence Life and I would like to encourage you to have what we are calling, "Sober Snow Buddies." Winter weather can be unforgiving (even walking from Somers to Kerst), and when judgement capacity is lowered with intoxication, this heightens the risk of serious injury and possibly death. We're asking that if you are choosing to drink and be outside while intoxicated, that you have with you a sober snow buddy who is there to make sure you make it home safely similar to the role of a Designated Driver. 

In addition, make sure you are familiar with our medical amnesty policy. Whenever you are in doubt or fear about yourself or a friends safety or well being, please make sure to call for help (whether it's an RA or staff member), as this is a much higher priority over sanctions.

Somers Duty Phone: 218-310-0789
Apartments Duty Phone: 218-310-0787

If you feel you may have suffered from frost bite (or frost nip!), know that any CSS undergrad student can seek care from Student Health Services in Somers Hall. (See below for more info.)

We would also like to remind students that Somers Hall is a dry building and no one on our campus is allowed to drink under the age of 21 (feel free to check out the Alcohol Policy online as well).  If you do decide to drink, please drink one or two less.  


Good clean fun people, that's what we want!!  Make good decisions today--- and every day.


Be bold and Benedictine in every word, thought and deed.


As always, let me know if you have any questions or concerns,

Take care and be safe!

Megan

Community  +  Hospitality  +  Respect  +  Stewardship  +  Love of Learning



MORE INFO ABOUT FROST BITE and ALCOHOL 
      ~From Staff at Student Health Services, excerpts from 5 Minute Medical Consult (2014)and Scandinavian Journal of Social Medicine (1990)

Sever frostbite of the upper extremities a psychosocial problem mostly associated with alcohol abuse.

Although the vasodilating properties of alcohol cause an initial sensation of warmth in the extremities, the resultant rapid fall in core temperature endangering life.

While the ability of the human body to produce and conserve heat are physiologic safeguards against cold injury, the most important defense would appear to be the conscious decision to seek adequate clothing and shelter. Undoubtedly, the most important action of alcohol in predisposing to cold injuries is its adverse effect on cerebral function.


Risk factors:
  • previous cold related injuries
  • decreased calorie intake
  • dehydration
  • impaired cerebral function
  • under the effects of alcohol or drug abuse
  • ambient temperature <17.8 C or 0 F
  • lack of proper clothing or shelter
  • vehicle failure leading to prolonged cold exposure

General prevention
  • dress in layers with appropriate cold weather gear
  • cover exposed areas and extremities appropriately
  • stay dry
  • avoid alcohol

Physical Symptoms
  • feet, hands, and face  most commonly affected
  • injured area appears cold, hurt, and white and is numb to touch. It progresses to blotchy-red, swollen and painful regions after rewarming.

If you feel you may have suffered from frost bite (or front nip!), know that any CSS undergrad student can seek care from Student Health Services on the ground floor of Somers Hall. (218)723-6282

-- 




Megan Perry-Spears
Dean of StudentsThe College of St. Scholastica
Tower Hall 2142
1200 Kenwood Avenue
Duluth, MN 55811
Phone: 218-723-6029 
Fax:: 218-723 6482 mperryspears@css.edu
http://www.css.edu    
TTY/TDD: 218-723-6790

Be bold.  Be Benedictine.  In every word, thought and deed.
Cor et Anima.
We are. . .CSS.

We believe in Radical Hospitality.  You and all your stories are welcome here.
We are. . .CSS.

Do not be daunted by the enormity of the world's grief. Do justly now. Love mercy now. You are not obligated to complete the work. Neither are you free to abandon it.     --From the Talmud