Friday, February 1, 2013

Heart Healthy Diet and Go Red!

If you haven't picked out your outfit yet, wear red to support the Go Red for Women Campaign. 
One factor that effects cardiovascular disease is diet.  If you are a student and want to learn more about nutrition and eating out join Storm's Advocates' Cenergy! program.  The first program will take place February 4th at 2:30pm in T87.  To sign up go to Cenergy! Sign up formFree snacks and prizes will be provided!
The American Heart Association has a history of researching cardiovascular disease.  In 2003, the American Heart Association faced a challenge;Cardiovascular disease claimed the lives of nearly 500,000 American women each year, yet women were not paying attention. In fact, many even dismissed it as an “older man's disease.” To dispel these myths of heart disease as the No. 1 killer of women, the American Heart Association, along with the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute created National Wear Red Day® to raise awareness of this critical issue.
Gallery Photo 28Each year, on the first Friday in February, millions of women and men come together to wear red, take action and commit to fighting this deadly disease.
One year later, in 2004, the AHA also created Go Red For Women - a passionate, emotional, social initiative designed to empower women to take charge of their heart health as well as band together and collectively wipe out heart disease. 
It challenges women to know their risk for heart disease and use the tools that that Go Red For Women provides to take action to reduce their personal risk.
Funds raised by Go Red For Women allow the American Heart Association to help women by offering educational programs, increase women's understanding about their risk for heart disease and support research to discover scientific knowledge about heart health. We turn science into materials and tools that healthcare providers and decision-makers can use to help women. 
Scientific guidelines on women and healthcare providers receive the most up-to-date strategies and treatments tailored to a woman's individual risk.
Since the first National Wear Red Day 10 years ago, tremendous strides have been made in the fight against heart disease in women, including:
  • 21% fewer women dying from heart disease
  • 23% more women aware that it's their No. 1 health threat
  • Publishing of gender-specific results, established differences in symptoms and responses to medications and women-specific guidelines for prevention and treatment
  • Legislation to help end gender disparities
But the fight is far from over as still hundreds of thousands of women still die each year. It's time to stand stronger, speak louder and join us in the fight this National Wear Red Day.
It's time to Go Red. Join us.
To learn more go http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/